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Ready Indiana & Indiana Skills Workforce Development

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Job Start 101: Building critical on-the-job skills

Amy Marsh
Director of College and Career Readiness Initiatives.

An initiative aimed at bridging the skills gap has created a web-based tool for students and job seekers to build a foundation for becoming workforce ready.

Job Start 101 began out of an initiative of the Business Roundtable, which focuses on education and workforce competitiveness. In 2009, the Business Roundtable convened the Springboard Project. They asked experts what resources Americans need to get the education and training that will help them succeed in the changing economy. They asked hundreds of employers what skills they felt college graduates are missing. And they worked with human resources expert to develop the curriculum found on Job Start 101.

“The purpose of Job Start 101 is to provide you a start on building these critical on-the-job skills,” said William Green, Chairman of Accenture, a management consulting, technology services and outsourcing company. “We believe the information is useful and relevant to situations you will face in your careers.”

Find all six modules here >> http://www.jobstart101.org/

Thank you for following the Ready Indiana group! We encourage you to also follow us on Twitter (@readyindiana).

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IndianaSkills.com aims to bridge the gap between the types of training and credentials people are pursuing in Indiana and the skills being requested by our state’s employers. The site provides information on employer demand for specific jobs, skills and certifications compared to the supply of graduates completing short-term training (two years or less beyond high school) related to these jobs, skills and certifications.

Welcome to JobSTART 101: Smart Tips and Real-World Training

Credential Creep Confirmed

Katie Coffin
Programs Assistant at Indiana Chamber of Commerce

By Doug Lederman, Inside Higher Ed 

The broad public policy push for more Americans to get a higher education leans heavily on the idea that those without a college degree are up a creek, because so many jobs in today’s technology and information economy (and more in tomorrow’s) will require a credential. Many critics of higher education, in turn, complain that the "college completion" movement has been fed by (and feeds) credential inflation, with employers imposing a degree requirement for many jobs that never required one (and still don’t) simply because they can. 

A new report offers evidence to support both arguments -- and reasons both for college officials to be optimistic about continuing demand for their degrees and to see danger signs on the horizon. 

The report, "Moving the Goalposts: How Demand for a Bachelor's Degree Is Reshaping the Workforce," is from Burning Glass Technologies, a Boston-based firm that studies employment markets by analyzing job advertisements. 

By comparing the educational attainment that employers are seeking in new workers (as evidenced in their job advertisements) with the current profile of the workforces in various fields, the study aims to quantify the extent of "upcredentialing" -- the phenomenon in which employers are seeking workers with degrees or credentials for jobs that have not historically required them. The focus is on "middle skills" jobs -- the many categories in the middle between entry level positions and high-skilled and upper-level managerial positions. 

"Looking down the road, there has to be some way to address the employers who don't necessarily think the college degree is really valuable, but just have no alternative for validating that people are work-ready," said Matt Sigelman, chief executive officer of Burning Glass. "Four-year schools need to be really careful that they are providing some job market preparedness, beyond just the credential." 

Read the full article here >>https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/09/09/demand-degrees-grows-many-fields-havent-required-them 

Thank you for following the Ready Indiana group! We encourage you to also follow us on Twitter (@readyindiana). 

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IndianaSkills.comaims to bridge the gap between the types of training and credentials people are pursuing in Indiana and the skills being requested by our state’s employers. The site provides information on employer demand for specific jobs, skills and certifications compared to the supply of graduates completing short-term training (two years or less beyond high school) related to these jobs, skills and certifications.

‘Degree in 3’ program shortens time to completion

Katie Coffin
Programs Assistant at Indiana Chamber of Commerce

By Emily Rogan, AACC 21st Century Center 

Kansas City is a hotbed for information technology companies. So hot that employers are apparently having a hard time finding enough qualified job applicants to fill open positions. 

In 2013, the Kansas Department of Labor estimated that 819 jobs for computer and information systems managers would be available long-term in the community. All of those jobs would require at least a bachelor’s degree. 

As demand for IT professionals intensifies, Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Overland Park, Kan., has teamed up with the University of Kansas and two local school districts to develop a program that aims to get students through college (with a bachelor’s degree) and into the workforce faster. 

How it works: Interested high school students enrolled in participating K-12 school districts—Olathe and Blue Valley are the two—will work with academic advisers to develop individual education plans that would allow students to: 

• Earn relevant college-level credits while still in high school. There is no limit to how many college credits students can earn while still in high school, but program administrators estimate 30 credits will be about average for the program. 
• Spend one year at JCCC to complete their associate degree. 
• Spend two years at the University of Kansas Edwards Campus to complete a Bachelor of Science degree in information technology. 

Supporters of the program say the efforts will save students money by allowing them to move through the system quicker, and at a significantly reduced cost. At $88 per credit, JCCC credits cost significantly less than the $290-plus per credit that local students can expect to pay at KU’s Edwards Campus. 

Read the full story here >> http://www.aacc21stcenturycenter.org/article/degree-3-program-shortens-time-completion/ 

Thank you for following the Ready Indiana group! We encourage you to also follow us on Twitter (@readyindiana). 

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IndianaSkills.comaims to bridge the gap between the types of training and credentials people are pursuing in Indiana and the skills being requested by our state’s employers. The site provides information on employer demand for specific jobs, skills and certifications compared to the supply of graduates completing short-term training (two years or less beyond high school) related to these jobs, skills and certifications.

We need to make sure students WANT to go to school here

Katie Coffin
Programs Assistant at Indiana Chamber of Commerce

Last month, we attended Align, Engage, Advance: Transforming Indiana’s Workforce. This was the meeting to bring local and regional partners together to learn about and discuss the Indiana Career Council’s strategic plan. 

The Indiana Education Workforce Innovation Network (EWIN) brought in national experts, including John Pryor, who leads higher education research at Gallup. He directed the research on the Gallup-Purdue Index, which measures the most important outcomes of higher education – the degree to which college graduates have great lives and great jobs. 

“If you want the best and brightest to stay in Indiana,” Pryor contends, “make sure they want to use your education system. 

The 2014 report shows that 39% of college graduates who are employed full time for an employer are engaged in the workplace. The report assesses: “If higher education does not lead graduates to an engaging job, then it has fallen down on a central expectation of students.” 

One change to education that was unanimously agreed upon was the need for a higher premium on experiential learning. 

“We need more internships that connect what students are learning in the classroom to what they will need to apply in a workforce setting.” 

See “Great Jobs, Great Lives: The 2014 Gallup-Purdue Index Report” here >>http://products.gallup.com/168857/gallup-purdue-index-inaugural-national-report.aspx 

Thank you for following the Ready Indiana group! We encourage you to also follow us on Twitter (@readyindiana). 

### 

IndianaSkills.comaims to bridge the gap between the types of training and credentials people are pursuing in Indiana and the skills being requested by our state’s employers. The site provides information on employer demand for specific jobs, skills and certifications compared to the supply of graduates completing short-term training (two years or less beyond high school) related to these jobs, skills and certifications.

Employers: Help us help you bridge the skills gap

Katie Coffin
Programs Assistant at Indiana Chamber of Commerce

Quite often we go to conferences and listen to employers talk about the troubles they have filling their workforces. Many times we hear an iteration of the same plea: “Just give me someone who will show up on time and work hard! We’ll provide the rest!” 

But at the Align, Engage, Advance conference last month, Mason Bishop of WorkEd Consulting says that’s no longer specific enough. In fact, it’s helping perpetuate the disconnect between what employers need and what skills schools focus on. 

We need to integrate industry-recognized skills into curricula. We need to help students earn in-demand credentials before graduation. We need to begin career pathway planning with students earlier. 

But in order for all of this to happen, we need employers to be specific about what they need in their workforce. Reinforcing the importance of soft skills is good, but in order to truly increase the quality of Indiana’s workforce, schools need to know what training to focus on. 

Ready Indiana and IndianaSkills.com exist to advocate for a skilled workforce and provide resources to all interest groups to make that happen. Visit www.readyindiana.org and www.indianaskills.com. 

Thank you for following the Ready Indiana group! We encourage you to also follow us on Twitter (@readyindiana). 

### 

IndianaSkills.comaims to bridge the gap between the types of training and credentials people are pursuing in Indiana and the skills being requested by our state’s employers. The site provides information on employer demand for specific jobs, skills and certifications compared to the supply of graduates completing short-term training (two years or less beyond high school) related to these jobs, skills and certifications.

Regional events will connect educators with employers

Katie Coffin
Programs Assistant at Indiana Chamber of Commerce

In partnership with Indiana employers, the Educational Workforce Innovation Network (EWIN), Center for Excellence in Leadership of Learning (CELL), and the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, the Indiana Youth Institute is pleased to announce two NEW events coming to Lafayette and Odon this year. 

The two events are regionally based opportunities for K-12 educators, state and regional government agencies, corporations, and youth-serving professionals to engage with employers about how best to connect Hoosier students with the education and careers that fit their skills and interests. 

Through panel discussions, keynote presentations and group networking, attendees will be connected to resources that enhance their ability to educate and train students to successfully pursue the postsecondary careers that exist within the region. 

Each event will include a tour with a local employer—giving educators a firsthand look at some of Indiana employers’ most state-of-the-art facilities. Join us at one of the following locations: 

September 24- Lafayette, Indiana 
Subaru of Indiana Automotive, Inc. 
Training and Reception Center 
Featuring a tour of Subaru 

October 2- Odon, Indiana 
Westgate Academy 
Conferencing and Training Center 
Featuring a tour of NSWC Crane 

Both sessions will run from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and include lunch. Each session is just $10 to participate. Professional Development Growth Points available for counselors and educators at no extra cost. 

Register via this link >> https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/default.aspx?EventID=1590912 

Thank you for following the Ready Indiana group! We encourage you to also follow us on Twitter (@readyindiana). 

### 

IndianaSkills.comaims to bridge the gap between the types of training and credentials people are pursuing in Indiana and the skills being requested by our state’s employers. The site provides information on employer demand for specific jobs, skills and certifications compared to the supply of graduates completing short-term training (two years or less beyond high school) related to these jobs, skills and certifications.

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